Nobody Wanted Him Because of What He Was Missing. Here’s Why Granddad Thinks It’s Just Perfect.

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Imperfection!! A seemingly negative word; one which would make you shy away from it, or the person perceived to be imperfect. However, when I think of it, I feel all the good, kind emotions well up inside me. Emotions such as that of empathy, kindness and understanding. I feel as if I am looking in a mirror – after all, I am flawed too? Isn’t everyone so? I remember the words of one of the most beautiful women in the history of mankind – Marilyn Monroe. She said “Imperfection is beauty, madness is genius and it is better to be absolutely ridiculous than absolutely boring”

This is a story of the two extremes in which shortcomings are perceived. A touching and a heartwarming tale about a boy named Kirill.

Kirill is an orphan who used to live in an orphanage in Kazakhstan. Like all other orphans, he would hope that one day he gets adopted. Kirill was put up for adoption when he was 20 days old, but four years later, he was still waiting for a family. The reason? Kirill was born without his right hand.

Although this world seems to be filled with people like those who rejected Kirill, there are some who are at the other end of the spectrum. Positive people! Those who do not view a limitation as negative. People who believe that it is not what you have that is important, but what you do with what you have. One such family adopted Kirill.

He now lives in Canada with Doug and Lesley Facey, his adoptive parents. Although the orphanage made it a point to highlight Kirill’s deficiency to Doug and Lesley, it was as irrelevant as the idle wind for which they cared not. To the Faceys, lacking a right hand was ‘not’ a disability.

“They kept emphasizing throughout the process, ‘Do you really want a child with one hand?’” said Doug Facey.

According to Nicole Skellenger of MLJ Adoptions, the skepticism of the orphanage reflects the difficulty of finding adoptive families for special needs children. Skellenger tells Yahoo that most parents look for young children without special needs, which can be heavily stigmatized in some countries and cultures.

The Faceys could never consider lacking a hand a disability because they had firsthand knowledge that it was not. Dough’s father Chris was also born without his right hand. And Chris was one hell of a successful man!

“How could I sit there and say ‘This is going to be a problem,’ when you’re looking at this man who’s been to the Paralympics,” said Lesley Facey, referring to her father-in-law. “He’s a great philanthropist in the city, he’s a very successful businessman. He’s the absolute perfect role model to show that this is not a disability, that he can do whatever he sets out to do, there’s nothing going to hold him back.”

When Doug and Lesley broke the good news to Chris, and showed him a picture of his new grandson, Chris’s emotional response of association and acceptance was spontaneous.

“I turned the screen for him to see the picture and all he did was point at the screen and say, ‘He’s like me.’ And you could see the tears,” Doug told CBC News.

Chris and Kirill met face to face, for the first time, at St. John’s International Airport at Newfoundland. Kirill immediately saw a kindred spirit in his grandfather, and Chris immediately took his grandson under his wing. Chris would give Kirill the confidence to dream big and would teach him how to give wings to those aspirations.

Photo Credit: http://spotlight-media.jp/article/217049037580612804

Photo Credit: http://spotlight-media.jp/article/217049037580612804

“I went over and knelt in front of him and I just stuck out my hand,” Chris Facey told CBC News. “[Kirill] was sort of taken aback and he reached out with his stump and he touched mine.”

Indeed, in the end it is not the perceived perfections or imperfections one has, but it is all about the courage, to overcome adversity and persevere, which leads us onto fame, fortune and happiness.

“Doug and Lesley can hold me over him. ‘If your grandfather can do it, you can do it,’” Chris told the CBC. “He’s going to get the best chance to be the best he possibly can. He’s bright, he’s smart… He’s a keeper.”

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